063 718 5590 online@kurtsafari.com
063 718 5590 online@kurtsafari.com

Although the Kruger National Park is filled with wild life, some animals are rarer than others. And while you will find endangered animals all over the world, South Africa has its own fair share of endangered species. As poaching continues to be a problem, the populations drop.

As you might know, one of the most vulnerable animals in South Africa, at this moment, is the rhino. What you might not know is that it is far from the only vulnerable animal that you might spot during your Kruger Park drives. Spotting an endangered animal is not only a memorable moment, but it is a reminder that we all have a duty to be, at the very least, concerned about these animals. Should they not be taken care of, the future generations will only see them in pictures.

All wildlife is special. And while conservation efforts publicise the declining rhino numbers, they fail to highlight the many other species on the endangered list.

Amphibians, birds of prey and the humble buck all make an appearance on this list.

Lower-sabie (1)
Kruger Park private safari
Rhino-Kruger-Park-Drives (1)
  • The Cheetah You might spot a cheetah while enjoying a Kruger Park safari, but did you know this is an endangered animal? They are the fast animals on land and they are truly beautiful creatures, but this is not a sentiment always shared by farmers who consider them a pest. Although the Kruger National Park, and other national parks around the country, do their best to keep fences fixed, the occasional cheetah finds a way out. They taunt, pester and kill nearby livestock. So farmers take action by killing the cheetah. Keep in mind that farmers are only one of the reasons the populations are declining.
  • The African Wild Dog You might wonder what the fuss is when a pack of wild dogs brings a Kruger road to a standstill. But once you see these hounds up close, when you see their frisky nature, you will appreciate their uniqueness. Sadly, they are endangered. And seeing a pack of them is something quite uncommon. There are less than 450 wild dogs left in South Africa. With their habitat diminishing, forcing them out and often ending up in snares, these dogs are becoming a rare sighting.
  • The Blue Crane While you won’t see this bird in the Kruger National Park, the blue crane is South Africa’s national bird. This vulnerable bird is native to the Western Cape but since the development of their natural habitat, many of these birds have perished and population numbers have depleted.
  • The Oribi It is the only antelope, and undeniably one of the cutest animals, on the list. The oribi is not critically endangered but its population size is growing smaller. A large portion of the population, around two-thirds of the animals, are found on privately owned property. Illegal dog hunting is to blame for the decrease in this animal population.
  • Pickergill’s Reedfrog The only frog on the list, Pickergill’s Reedfrog is considered to be critically endangered. The frog is tiny, only 3 cm in length, but the size of the creature should not be what determines its importance. It is found along the Kwa-Zulu Natal coastline and with the urban developments, its ecosystem has been all but destroyed.
Oribi kruger safari
The-Blue-Crane kruger safari

Before it’s too late

With Kruger National Park drives, you will be seeing plenty of animals not on this list. But the lion, elephant and of course the rhino, are all animals living in the shadow of possible extinction in the future. When you visit any national park in South Africa, you are aiding conservation by helping the park not only with funding but with awareness.

The more people who see the beautiful animals native to Africa, the longer the legacy of these animals will live on. At Kurt Safari, we are dedicated and passionate about conservation. And we want to share our passion for Africa with you.

Book your Kruger National Park tours today, with Kurt Safari, and experience a landscape almost unchanged by time.

The park is one of the last places in the world where the wildlife is untouched and roaming free.

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